Assembly Member Eloise Reyes Staff Labeled as Out of Control

Eloise Reyes has been your assembly member for about two years now and nothing has changed, right?

Wrong. She has made this area more divisive and polarized than ever before. One major change may not look so bad on the surface, but it is now affecting Moreno Valley.

Under former Assembly Member Cheryl Brown Rialto had a strong young man acting as our liaison with the Assembly Member’s office. I can tell you as someone who had issues with connecting to the Unemployment Office Cheryl Brown’s staff helped a lot more than the current staff. Before Eloise won the election we had Josue Castillo as our Rialto liaison. Josue lived in Rialto and really made you feel like they cared, even if you were not aligned politically.

Now we have Daniel Peeden, a progressive Democrat who gives you the feeling he is trying to intimidate you rather than help you. He spends his time pushing a very strong progressive agenda and it doesn’t feel like he cares who the Assembly Member cuts down or steps on along the way. If you’re not a progressive you have no worth to him. He spends his time attacking our County Supervisor Josie Gonzales (a Democrat) on warehouse projects in the Bloomington Area, yet has given a pass to the City of Rialto as they dump warehouses right on top of long established neighborhoods and eating up prime real estate in Rialto.

This has been going on for 2 years and it is getting old, but this isn’t the reason we penned this post. This isn’t a political attack on Eloise to unseat her because she is running unopposed.

This post exists to call attention to Public Officials being held accountable for acting like children and feeding an angry mob.

Daniel is a twin (Darrell Peeden); his twin was seeking an open seat on the Moreno Valley Unified School Board. Darrell and Daniel Peeden posed with another person with an F Trump sign! Now we can love or hate the president if we want, but if you A) represent a community on behalf of an Assembly Member maybe you should have a little more tact on how you publicly share your disdain, and B) if you’re running for school board maybe you shouldn’t be using profanity publicly because you’re representing Students, Parents and Staff. You are supposed to be an example to them.

Why is Eloise Reyes getting attached to this post? She condones this behavior and celebrates it. As you see in the photo below her staff are given kudos for working hard on ignoring constituents that don’t align with her politically and shoving through a very progressive plan of action. Remember that this seat has been Democrat forever but never with a person or staff so dedicated to whipping the assembly district into a frenzy.

Reports are that no call from the assembly member has gone out to remove this photo from social media and Darrell Peeden was appointed to fill a vacant seat on the Moreno Valley Unified School District without an election of THE PEOPLE!

Normal everyday people are already so full of hate, shouldn’t our elected officials and their staff be required to use just a little bit of thought when creating social content?

Change of the guard at West Valley Water

Normally when we are writing about West Valley Water it is to talk about employees being fired and questionable actions from the organizations Board of Directors.

This week things took a change where some Like Diana Araiza are claiming a victory for ratepayers and transparency.

An Article penned by The IE Voice  said “After two years of ongoing controversy, West Valley Water District (WVWD) Board of Directors ousted President Dr. Clifford O. Young and Vice-President Greg Young at last Thursday’s board meeting”.

According to reports complaints about suspected misuse of ratepayer funds created by West Valley Water District Ratepayers Association were forwarded to the California Fair Political Practices Commission and eventually to the State Attorney General’s Office for investigation. No word has yet surfaced on what actions have come from these elevated complaints.

The West Valley Water District Ratepayers Association is just the latest group to call out questionable moves by West Valley Water Board led by Clifford Young and supported by Greg Young. For more than three years now local councilmen, community members, community advocates and ratepayers have been railing on this Elected Board to change what they call questionable tactics.

Many people that have been involved over the years have begun to loose faith that anything would be done about the perceived corruption because in the last election for the Board Clifford Young had stacked the deck to show he had a 4-1 margin against any opposition with the election of Michael Taylor and Kyle Crowther.

Yet last week Michael Taylor and Kyle Crowther proved everyone wrong when they took action to remove both Clifford Young from his role as president and Greg Young as Vice President joined by Don Olinger.

At the WVWD meeting last Thursday, board member Donald Olinger was joined by fellow board members Michael Taylor and Kyle Crowther to facilitate what some have described as nothing less than a coup. By a 3-2 vote they removed Clifford Young from his role as board president and also voted for the removal of Greg Young from his position as vice president. In their places, board member Michael Taylor was elected board president and Kyle Crowther assumed the role of vice president.

Taylor took immediate control of the board meeting and wasted no time charting a new way forward. He recommended that in the future, each director serve a two-year term as president and called for an annual review of the president’s performance by his peers on the board to make sure whoever is serving in the role of president is doing a good job.

He also called for legal to examine the decorum of the board members toward fellow board members and WVWD employees themselves. Taylor wasted no time expounding on exactly what he meant by this. “I don’t want them yelled at. I don’t want them cussed at. I don’t want them to have their jobs threatened.” He asserted adamantly. – IE Voice

For more on this story go to the IE Voice

 

Image

Sean Flynn Offers A New Approach To Creating Change In San Bernardino

We had a chance meet with Sean Flynn a candidate for the 31st Congressional District which stretches from Pomona all the way to Mentone!

This district covers a large portion of Rialto and most of San Bernardino.

The city of San Bernardino has been in trouble ever since the city went through bankruptcy and things have been pretty bleak. Many former San Bernardino residents that have returned for business or visits have described what they see when returning as a gut punch. Public Safety services and General Public services took a hit and still struggle to come back to life as San Bernardino rises from Bankruptcy.

The recent shooting that put 8 people in the hospital including one minor has once again surfaced the talk of what can be done in San Bernardino to deal with crime? The answer currently is to place private security officers at the location of this most recent shooting and argue over how to police a city that seems to be still dealing with the massive collapse of their economy.

The ideas being put forth now are the same old answers that sadly haven’t worked and even though the current congressman feels bad for those effected by this horrible incident he has nothing worthwhile to offer as a solution.

Sean Flynn sat down with us to talk about a lot of what he wants to bring to the District if he is elected to Congress in November. His take on San Bernardino even before this horrible situation is so vital we thought it would be a good idea to put this part out before we release the entire interview.

We thought this idea of taking federal resources and applying them to struggling communities was very innovative and hasn’t been brought forward yet, what do you think?

Video

Rialto Has a New Entertainment Destination

Rialto your theater has arrived!

One of the first tenants to open in the new Renaissance Marketplace made a big fancy splash last week. They held a series of Friends and Family and VIP openings prior to the official opening to the public on August 16th. Everyone was amazed to see the finished product that had been in the works for more than 4 years!

Former Councilwoman Lynn Hirtz was the one responsible for securing this keystone portion of the new Renaissance Marketplace. In a phone interview former Councilwoman Lynn Hirtz said “she was happy to see the new theater come to reality and she couldn’t wait to enjoy a movie here at home in what she has heard is such a beautiful finished product”.

Other notable dignitary’s that shared with us their excitment over the new center were Community College Board Member Joseph Williams. Mr Williams was “excited to see so much buzz about things happening in Rialto. There are good people here in Rialto looking for a place to have fun and enjoy life and I am glad to see this development provide that”. Another person excited to see the new theater was former Assembly Member Carter. Mrs Carter was “amazed at how beautiful they made the theater and really worked hard to integrate some of the local flair into the building”.

One common thread in everyone’s minds is that this theater is amazing!

Cinemark offers the following special options:

  • XD Sound Theaters – These theaters rain sound all around you as you are immersed in the most inclusive sound experience ever imagined as well as larger screens.
  • DBOX seats – These DBOX seats bring you into the action with motion activated seats where you can control the intensity level.
  • Luxury Seats – Every seat in the theater is a soft reclining seat with heat warmers and a swivel tray for all of your snacks.
  • Inside Restaurant – The inside of this theater is more than popcorn and soda they offer Pizza Hut pizza, Hagen Daz ice cream, Starbucks Coffee, Alcohol and Restaurant with a full menu!

Moviegoers can sign up for Cinemark Movie Club, a unique monthly movie membership program offering ticket and concession discounts along with other exclusive benefits for $8.99 per month. Movie lovers can instantly join and begin taking advantage of their benefits at all Cinemark locations by downloading the Cinemark app or by visiting cinemark.com/movieclub.

After touring this newest icon to hit the landscape it is clear that Rialto will do to other cities what has been happening to Rialto. This theater has the potential to pull people from neighboring cities especially Fontana.

Grand Openings & Other Fun Stuff This Weeked

Rialto has gone from dirt lots, to construction noise and finally new stores opening in Rialto.

We have already seen Five Below & 24 Hour Fitness open up and now things are really going to kick into high gear.

This week we saw WSS & Coffee Bean open up and the next couple months there will be a flood of new businesses opening coupled with your normal events that happen all year long. If you can make it you should check out as many of these Grand Openings as possible so you can learn about all the new stuff coming to Rialto. Also don’t forget about the last Movie night being held at Bud Bender park!

MOVIES IN THE PARK: Featuring The Sandlot
“Free Admission”
7:00 pm – 10:30 pm • Movie starts at 8:00 pm
Bud Bender Park • 235 N. Lilac Ave, Rialto
Blankets, jackets, and lawn chairs are suggested.
Information: (909) 421-4949

Grand Opening of 7-Eleven at Renaissance Marketplace 1130 W. Renaissance Parkway, Rialto. This Friday, July 27 from 10 am – 4 pm.

The City of Rialto will be taking some of the young ladies (ages 12-19) of the community on a field trip to the 6th Annual Girl Talk Conference. The theme of this year’s conference is Social Media, and the correlating hashtag is #ITSABOUTYOU. The conference will hold special workshops on various topics, including: art class, vision board/goal setting, self-defense, texting and driving, self-esteem, and more.
In order to complete your RSVP, a parent or guardian must download, fill-out, sign, scan and email the CITY OF RIALTO and GIRL TALK permission slips to rsmith@rialtoca.gov. Permission slips can be found here: http://yourrialto.com/wp-cont…/…/2018/07/Girl-Talk-Flyer.pdf
The conference, transportation, lunch, and a snack are FREE. Registration is limited to the first 20 young ladies who register.

Please Join Us In Celebrating the new WSS in Rialto, California!
630 W. Foothill Boulevard
Saturday, July 28, 2018
10:00am
Ribbon Cutting Ceremony: 10:30am
There will be music, free haircuts, refreshments, giveaways and more throughout the entire day!
Meet and Greets with:
Ramon Morales, Ivica Zubac and Z-Ro

This community event will feature free health screenings, resources, and backpacks until supplies last! Join us. You won’t want to miss out!

Who: Assemblymember Eloise Gomez Reyes, Senator Connie M. Leyva, Supervisor Gonzales, and the Bloomington Community Health Center

What: Backpack Giveaway and Health Fair

When: Saturday, July 28th from 9am-1pm

Where: Corner of Valley Blvd. and Cedar Ave in Bloomington
18601 Valley Blvd, Bloomington, CA 92316

For more information or to RSVP, please contact Roxanna Gracia at (909) 381-3238 or at Roxanna.gracia@asm.ca.gov

 

Will the City Council Choose to Overtax Residents This Week?

(Photo by Micah Escamilla/The Sun)

On Tuesday July 24th at 6pm the City Council has the task of looking at the next years budget and the impacts of $120 to $150 Million in debt over the next ten years. There are a lot of tax ideas on the table and for the most part the city staff and the budget advisory committee have not advised any additional tax increases.

What the council chooses to do is always a surprise……

The scary thing is that even looking down the barrel of hundreds of millions of dollars in debt the current council seems to be spending money like drunken sailors. Most recently the massive 8% raise that Rialto Police Department got with a 2 year retro pay back wasn’t cheap. Early calculations put this raise at almost an additional Million Dollars a year (money we don’t have). There is no fund plan to replace equipment for these cops or to add additional officers to the streets as Rialto prepares to open a 2nd major retail development, we simply paid off the cops for some reason.

What is sad is the Fire Department and other city departments all are still waiting for their turn to get a hand out and sadly we’re not sure there is anything left.

Some of the taxes your council will be looking at adding to your bills are:

  • Sales Tax – Several cities impose a sales tax surcharge of 0.25% to 1.0% to help pay for public safety services. Local cities with such levies include Riverside,  and Menifee, among others. If the tax measure restricts the use of funds for a specific purpose such as public safety, then
    Proposition 13 requires a 2/3 super majority vote. This creates a high hurdle for passage,due to the absence of overwhelming popular support. To avoid the 2/3 vote requirement, some cities establish the tax measure as a general tax (so they can abuse and steal this money as they see fit) and commit to use the funds to maintain or enhance public safety (often with advisory votes). Sales taxes are the City’s largest revenue source for the first time in years, due to the completion of several retail projects (Rialto Marketplace) and the capture of sales taxes from the Medline Industries facility. The City forecasts that it will receive $16,231,000 in FY 18, a growth of $9,053,377 since FY 12. Medline Industries reported quarterly sales taxes to the City for the first time in June 2017 and the City projects full year returns of $4,400,000. The City agreed to rebate 50% of this amount to Medline as an incentive to relocate its point of sale to Rialto, so the net benefit to the General Fund will be $2,200,000. As the Renaissance Marketplace completes toward the end of FY 18, sales taxes should receive another boost of approximately $750,000 per year in FY 19.
  • Utility Users Tax – The City adopted the Utility User Tax in 2003 as an 8% levy upon all utility consumption. This revenue projects for FY 18 at $13,890,500. On June 5, 2018, the City’s voters approved a permanent extension of this revenue source. This revenue has grown reliably by approximately $500,000 each year because of economic expansion, and may receive continuing boosts in the years ahead from new development (Niagara and Building 5/6). The principal risk (other than repeal) is the trend toward co-generation and legislative exemption of certain utilities from the payment of local taxes. Households are also “cutting the cord” and eliminating cable TV service and landline phone service, depressing those sources of utility tax income. This is now a permanent tax at 8% and is supposed to be reduced to 6% as promised after the passage of the tank farm tax. 
  • PERS Tax – In 1958, the City adopted Ordinance No. 414 creating a property tax surcharge to fund employee retirement. The City Council annually established the tax rate and collected the property tax. The rate ranged from a low of 0.1000 to a high of 0.1506, with a historical average of 0.1316. When voters approved the Utility Tax in 2003, the City Council did not abolish the tax, but simply set the rate to 0.0% each year thereafter. The City retains the authority to levy the tax. The current City Attorney opines that the City may use the revenues from the PERS Tax only to pay for benefits.
  • Residential Community Facilities District – A Residential Community Facilities District imposes a special tax upon the owners of new residential units offsetting the cost of public services, ideally producing a neutral fiscal impact to the City. Generally, residential development costs the City more in services than it provides in revenue, thus the special tax. The Developer of a new residential project approves the special tax and then passes it along to the homebuyer. The homebuyer considers this tax in the purchase decision.
  • Transient Occupancy Tax – Most cities in California levy a transient occupancy tax on short-term stays in local lodging facilities. Rates range from 4% to 15% statewide. Rialto’s rate is currently 9% of gross room revenues. Rialto does not have a significant lodging sector; however, developers propose two new hotels in the Renaissance Specific Plan and the City Council set high priorities for such development. Increasing the TOT rate may discourage these uses, and the City Council has reduced other development impact fees to incentivize the new hotels. An increase in the TOT requires a majority vote of the electorate at a general election. The current rate is 9% in Rialto.
  • Fire Protection District – A Fire Protection District provides a variant to the other forms of public safety taxes. A city may establish a Fire Protection District upon 2/3 voter approval – they are deemed special taxes under Proposition 13. The new district may levy an assessment as an ad valorem tax, a parcel tax, or other approved structures. The monies raised go directly to a special fund available only for fire protection
    services. These funds may supplant or supplement funding from other sources, including the General Fund, Community Facility District levies, and others. Ultimately, the new revenues from this structure release existing general fund revenues to support other services. The responsibility for managing the Fire Protection District typically resides with the City Council. The District could establish the tax at the full net cost of Fire Department (approximately $16 million) or some lesser amount. (This tax is levied on everyone, there are no special exemptions for Seniors or Low Income individuals)
  • Measure U – Adopted by voters in 2014, Measure U established a business license tax on fuel storage capacity. On November 4, 2014, Rialto voters approved a tax of up to $1.00 per cubic foot of liquid storage capacity for any wholesale liquid fuel storage business. The primary targets for the new tax were the businesses that operate the “tank farm” on Riverside Avenue, south of the I-10 Freeway. The businesses scheduled to pay the tax included, among others, Kinder Morgan, Tesoro, and Shell Oil. The tax did not apply to retail service stations. The City Council pledged to reduce the utility tax from 8% to 6% upon implementation of Measure U. On February 22, 2017, the Superior Court for the County of San Bernardino ruled in favor of the City of Rialto and determined that the tax was valid and enforceable. The plaintiff businesses then filed an appeal with the Appellate Court of the State of California. The parties expect to present the case to the Appellate Court in May 2018, with oral briefings approximately 6-9 months thereafter (late 2018 or early 2019). The City expects a decision before June 2019. Depending upon the outcome, either party could appeal to the California Supreme Court, lengthening the time before a final determination. The City holds approximately $22 million in escrow pending the court determinations. The annual revenue averages approximately $8 million. The pledge to reduce the Utility Tax by 2% reduces the annual revenue yield by approximately $3.6 million. (this tax was sold as the savior to our financial woes and now there are talks of settling with the tank farm operators making this entire effort a wash if the council were to keep their promise on reducing the Utility Users Tax).
  • Truck Transportation Fee – The BAC and the City Council have asked whether a fee can be levied upon truckers or trucking operations that burden City streets. The City would levy the fee on a per trip basis or some other logical driver using tracking technologies. The City Attorney opined that state and federal law likely prohibit a fee upon trucking for the use of City streets. A fee based upon weight may be permissible but the City could only impose the fee to recover permitting costs (and not generate revenue for public service costs). Based upon
    CA opinion, it does not appear to provide a significant revenue source except as a cost recovery mechanism for the regulatory costs. Keep in mind the Trash Fee (TAX) is completely legal. The city charges you a fee every month because trash trucks cause to much damage to the road. So the city can tax you but not the people responsible for the damage!!!! Also remember Burrtec has a 10 year contract with the city and single handedly funds the Mayors campaign efforts.
  • Code Enforcement – Cities often levy fines for non-compliance with property maintenance codes. Rialto issues administrative citations for code violations and collects a small amount of fines, penalties, and interest. The City Council directs Code Enforcement to obtain compliance, rather than collect revenue. Consequently, our implementation procedures routinely waive fines upon compliance. The City
    does collect out of pocket abatement costs. In 2015, staff proposed to levy additional costs for re-inspection costs but the City Council tabled the proposal for further clarification, again repeating the primary purpose of Code Enforcement. The City currently does not collect significant sums from code enforcement violations, primarily cost recovery for third party abatement costs.  The Staff Recommendation is that City Council revisit added costs for extraordinary Code Enforcement compliance issues, notably repeat offenders. BAC Recommends that the City Council add stronger provisions to the Rialto Municipal Code authorizing administrative citations to encourage compliance, seeking restitution from repeat offenders, and instituting procedures to resolve code violations expeditiously. Get ready for the hammer to drop!!!!
  • Street Sweeping Program – Most cities cite vehicles parked in areas scheduled for street sweeping. Throughout California, Regional Water Quality agencies are aggressively requiring cities to implement storm water remediation programs, and street sweeping programs implement this mandate. The City is developing the mechanics of a program to improve the efficiency of street sweeping. The City currently contracts with Burrtec for street sweeping services. Burrtec simply avoids parked cars, resulting in inefficient sweeping. The City must incur capital costs for signage installation, and recover its costs from fees. The goal of this program is compliance and neutral costs, and not primarily as a revenue generator. The City estimates the potential 1st year net revenue at $700,000.

So residents have to decide how much more taxes are you prepared to pay? How much more control are you willing to give and why are you allowing the council to act so recklessly with your money?

If you’re scared of talking to these people in public face to face then email them or call them. The only way they get the message is by knowing that there are others out there with questions!

MAYOR: DEBORAH ROBERTSON

drobertson@rialtoca.gov

(909) 873-8874

(909) 644-8520 Cell

MAYOR PRO TEM: ED SCOTT

edscott@rialtoca.gov

(909) 875-0653

(909) 746-7643 Cell

COUNCIL MEMBER: JOE BACA, JR.

jbaca@rialtoca.gov

(909) 820-2519

COUNCIL MEMBER: RAFAEL TRUJILLO

rtrujillo@rialtoca.gov

(909) 820-2525

(909) 562-2476 Cell

COUNCIL MEMBER:

ANDY CARRIZALES

acarrizales@rialtoca.gov

(909) 820-2525

(909) 586-2020 Cell

Planning Gina Gibson

ggibson@rialtoca.gov

(909) 421-7240

Robb Steel Development Services Director

rsteel@rialtoca.gov

(909) 820-8008

Ahmad Ansari Interm City Administrator

Office: (909) 820-2528 |

City Cell: (909) 644-2032 |

Email: aansari@rialtoca.gov

While You Were Sleeping Massive Changes Took Place in Rialto

 

 

On June 12th 2018 the Rialto City Council voted to move animal control services over to Riverside County rather than look to keep those operations local. Interim Police Chief Mark Kling went on and on at the June 12th meeting saying how nice the Riverside County Shelter is and how this will be better for Rialto. The Police Chief asked three of the people from the Riverside County west shelter to come out and do a presentation.

What was poor in this presentation is that there were a lot of games being played when it came to the shelters’ kill numbers. When Chief Kling spoke about Devore he used exact numbers when referring to Riverside County’s kill rates, they spoke in vague percentages. There was no mention of any issues are problems. For example what happens when the shelter runs out of space or how will the city get the word out to people, letting them know where they can find their lost pets as of July 1st. This is very concerning since it is right before the July 4th holiday when most people loose their pets. There is no money being dedicated to getting the word out in mass in the next four days (thank god for this blog). We did speak to John Welsh with Riverside County Shelter systems and he did say he would be reaching out to local media (including this publication) to work to educate residents on the change in shelter services

While the Riverside shelter is beautiful and very state of the art, we have questions on whether the facility is designed to handle animal services for two counties let alone two of the biggest counties in the State of California. John Welsh told us that this contract was possible because of the work that Riverside County has done to address their numbers of animals housed in their shelters. John Welsh seemed pretty optimistic that there wouldn’t be any problems with reaching capacity.

We sat down with Police Captain Wilson with Rialto Police and he said that this is not a perfect situation, but it was something worth looking into. He also broke down some of the items that were not clear in Police Chief Kling’s presentation to council on June 12th.

  • Devore requires injured animals to be taken to a vet prior to being admitted to the shelter forcing the city to pay a separate vet bill – Captain Wilson was not sure why in house vet services covered by SB County are not used to cover these costs.
  • Devore doesn’t like to take cats and will not take kittens. Currently if we have kittens we have to take them to Grand Terrace at a cost of $70 a kitten.  Riverside County will take cats and kittens as part of the contract – Reports from people living in the Riverside County area are reporting that even though Riverside County takes kittens,  they euthanize them (see image below). John Welsh from the Shelter system wasn’t sure about the complaint below but did acknowledge that they are getting better at dealing with felines.
  • Riverside County has a panel set up for animal seizures from homes found to be unfit costing the city money to hold the animals while the case is adjudicated – What this will do is build a greater barrier between owners who may be likely to seek out an opportunity to fix the problems found and keep their animals.
  • There is no plan to address the longer travel time to the new shelter when picking up lost animals – According to the last Southern California Associated Governments local profile on Rialto “32 percent of Rialto households own one or no vehicles”. This means over a third of our population will lack the needed resources to travel 55 mins to get to the shelter to pick up their animals. Another problem is that 7.8% work and live in Rialto, while 92.2% commute to other places meaning that people who have a car to get to this far away shelter are at work and stuck in traffic. The Riverside shelter does not have late hours and are only open for a short time on Saturdays and closed on Sundays.
  • There is no plan in place to deal with the problem of what happens when the shelter is full – Riverside County already has a big problem with lost and abandoned animals. Now with Fontana, Rialto, Loma Linda, Grand Terrace and Colton adding animals to the system the question isn’t if , but when they hit capacity. John Welsh told us that this contract was possible because of the work that Riverside County has done to address their numbers of animals housed in their shelters. John Welsh seemed pretty optimistic that there wouldn’t be any problems with reaching capacity.
  • When asked about the accusation that Riverside County is reaching well outside their boarders in an effort to fill the gap of a lack of adequate funding in a County facing massive budget shortfalls Captain Wilson confirmed knowledge of Riverside County hasting budget problems and that these contracts would provide some relief – So the question is how can we guarantee that we will still get what we have been promised out of the contract and that they wont start making massive cuts to save the program? John Welsh admitted that the shelter spent the last year in the red but that they did not hunt out this contract, the city of Rialto came to them.

We spoke to someone in the office of SB County Supervisor Janice Ruthaford. They claimed that Riverside County was poaching San Bernardino County cities in an attempt to cover cuts in funding, that SB County has set aside $10 Million to develop a new state of the art animal control facility to be placed in a more central location to cities in the valley that currently use Devore. Dan Flores from Josie Gonzalez office also confirmed that there is a plan to build a facility here in the Inland Valley region. He did say that if they did not have the partners from local cities that they may be forced to re think the design and capacity of the facility.

The problem with this is that the change in shelter services was made without any public input. The Police and city are quick to run out and promote the latest tax increase or law, but when they are looking at a hot button issue like moving animal shelter services they are tight lipped and move under the cover of darkness.

The problems that still exist are access to the animals for the Rialto population, why the city was so tight lipped about the change and why are they still waiting to tell people about the anticipated change in shelter locations? We here at Rialto Now feel confident that we have spurred the right people into moving with the information sooner rather than later.

 

 

Previous Older Entries Next Newer Entries